Mark Rogers

Mark Rogers

Mark Rogers is chief executive of Birmingham City Council and chair of SOLACE
  • The sector must be heard

    26 April 2017

    Mark Rogers says campaigning in the run-up to June’s General Election and the ongoing Brexit process must not overshadow the countless agendas that genuinely affect people’s lives.


  • There’s no place like home

    14 February 2017

    Mark Rogers welcomes the housing white paper but hopes it will be bold enough to support the widest choice of property from the public, social and private sectors


  • Reimagining health and social care

    10 January 2017

    Prevention, innovation and integration have been touted as the route to relieving social care pressures, but an overhaul of leadership and governance is also vital. Mark Rogers outlines his proposals for transforming the health and care system.


  • The road to recovery

    29 November 2016

    The recent Ofsted report into Birmingham City Council’s children’s services may have highlighted a poor service, but it is getting better, says chief executive Mark Rogers


  • Shaping the Autumn Statement wishlist

    26 October 2016

    Mark Rogers explains what the chancellor needs to deliver for local government in next month's Autumn Statement


  • Second-hand daylight

    05 October 2016

    Mark Rogers reflects on his busy three years as SOLACE president and passes on some crucial lessons to his sucessor – including where best to store that badge of office.


  • Curing the health crisis

    21 September 2016

    Mark Rogers makes his plea to Government over the future of STPs and the role social care must play in the national health crisis


  • Stick your input in, your output out

    17 August 2016

    Birmingham City Council's chief executive Mark Rogers says local government can learn from Half Man, Half Biscuit’s Nigel Blackwell.


  • Tale as old as time

    20 July 2016

    The referendum shows we need something new from our leaders and storytelling could be crucial to rebuilding trust, says Mark Rogers


  • Up the hill backwards

    21 June 2016

    Mark Rogers says local government must now focus on prevention, help and independence for citizens. An easy task? Perhaps not...


  • A journey of progress

    02 June 2016

    Following the announcement that control of Birmingham’s children’s services could be transferred to a trust, Mark Rogers explains how a three-year improvement plan is ensuring improvement in the city


  • Reading the small print

    25 May 2016

    Mark Rogers gives his view on the Queen's Speech and considers hints at another devolution drive building in central government


  • Give us everything

    12 April 2016

    Mark Rogers says what local government really needs is commitment to devolution across Westminster


  • A lesson for us all

    01 March 2016

    Mark Rogers explains how a speech he gave to graduates helped him reflect on the public service values he prizes most


  • Taking stock of the year

    22 December 2015

    Mark Rogers reflects how his local government year has transformed the way he works as a chief executive.


  • What role for councils after Paris?

    19 November 2015

    Mark Rogers considers how local government is in a unique position to deal with the national response following the tragedy in Paris


  • Boys don't cry

    20 October 2015

    Mark Rogers reflects on how life lessons have affected his outlook on local government. Building from failure, it turns out, is Just Like Heaven.


  • Keeping it real

    06 October 2015

    SOLACE president Mark Rogers explains to delegates at its annual summit why local government must be versatile and adaptable in order to stay relevant and credible


  • Standing at the sky's edge

    22 September 2015

    Mark Rogers considers the financial precipice facing local government and asks what to do about social care


  • Local government is missing important trick

    18 August 2015

    Mark Rogers says devolution has pitched council against council and LEP against LEP while central government stands on the sidelines yelling ‘faster, faster; more, more, now, now!’