Dan Corry

Dan Corry

Dan Corry is CEO of NPC, a think-tank and consultancy on third sector issues. He is a former Treasury and Downing Street economic adviser
  • Missing the bigger picture?

    20 September 2017

    It’s easy to ignore major issues and focus on smaller things to do and improve. But, argues Dan Corry, in public services there comes a time when you can no longer ignore that fact that the system is not working.


  • The age of austerity isn’t over yet

    16 August 2017

    Those who think the Government’s change of rhetoric on public funding spells a bold end to years of austerity should guess again, warns Dan Corry.


  • Are things getting too complex?

    12 July 2017

    Over-complexity is making solutions more difficult to achieve, writes Dan Corry as he argues that keeping things simple just might be the key to solving many of today’s local authorities’ problems


  • Time to wake up the sleeping sector?

    14 June 2017

    Dan Corry muses on how to get the charitable sector more involved in public services and challenges ministers to make it a new priority


  • Flying into Brexit times

    10 May 2017

    Brexit is one of the key issues of our time and ought to be among the top issues for people on which to decide their vote, writes Dan Corry.


  • Rethinking the role of civil society

    10 April 2017

    Dan Corry argues for a resurrection of civil society to generate human capital, social enterprise, ideas, networks, practical help and wellbeing.


  • Capital gains?

    28 February 2017

    Dan Corry looks at potential solutions to reinvesting in the buildings and equipment underpinning the country’s struggling public services.


  • Who are you?

    24 January 2017

    What does the prime minister stand for? Dan Corry attempts to work out the puzzling PM.


  • Come what May…

    06 December 2016

    Dan Corry considers the outcome of the rather grim inaugural fiscal announcement of the new May Government


  • Troubled programmes and evaluations

    01 November 2016

    The Government took the wrong approach to its Troubled Families Programme and local and national politicians can both learn serious lessons, writes Dan Corry


  • Shuffle the pack

    17 August 2016

    Theresa May has ensured it is all change in Whitehall but what will the departmental shake-up actually achieve? Dan Corry explains.


  • The show must go on

    13 July 2016

    As Britain enters deeply uncertain times, Dan Corry explores the many questions raised following the referendum result


  • Overlooking the EU experts

    07 June 2016

    With the EU referendum looming large, Dan Corry examines why experts have been largely ignored in the run-up to this month’s vote


  • Reach for a helpful partnership

    04 May 2016

    Local government must not lock charities out of work and should use devolution to bring about dramatic change, writes Dan Corry


  • Avoiding Osborne’s dilemmas

    01 April 2016

    What do you do when you miss your targets? Dan Corry considers a cautionary tale from George Osborne


  • Strong at the broken places

    25 February 2016

    David Cameron’s speech about getting at the root of inequality by backing strong intervention for dysfunctional families and communities is admirable. But, argues Dan Corry, is this aim achievable?


  • Dare to be different

    12 January 2016

    The OBR should try to forecast for itself what might happen to spending and tax instead of just following the Government’s statements, writes Dan Corry


  • Clarifying the role of charities

    10 November 2015

    Devolution may seem like the answer to the sector’s prayers but, argues Dan Corry, local government must not overlook the voluntary sector in its rush to change


  • New wave or old school?

    30 September 2015

    Democracy is changing, and as Dan Corry says, the recent exploits of Jeremy Corbyn could be just one of many examples of society seeking something different from the political spectrum.


  • Funding by results

    12 August 2015

    Government funding will increasingly depend on outcomes, Dan Corry believes.